Please Don't Paint Our Planet Pink!

A story ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE for KIDS ... and their adults! 

“I’ve always wondered what would happen if CO2 were visible. Now I know!”
— Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth, and founder of 350.org
“This book is smart and funny – and about as important as a book can be.”
— Kathleen Dean Moore, co-editor of Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril
“Every child and parent should read this important story.”
— Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor, Penn State University, and author of “Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change"

Available Now!

Please Don't Paint Our Planet Pink!

A story ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE for KIDS ... and their adults! 

Written by Gregg Kleiner
Illustrated by Laurel Thompson
Book Design by Alisha Lorentz

What might happen if we could SEE carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? What if CO2 were, say, pink? In this engaging, funny, and highly timely book, a young boy whose parents named him Wilbur "in honor of that pig in Charlotte's Web" discovers the power of the human imagination and how he can tap that power to see a shade of pink he has never imagined – a pink so astonishing it just might save the Planet. With help from his geeky "dorkasaurus" Dad and a pair of bright green goggles, young Will learns all about carbon and caring, carpooling and climate change, and how learning to see "this particular pink" will help all of us keep our Planet cool.

PURCHASE the book at your local indie bookstore, or online right here.
FOLLOW Gregg Kleiner on Twitter at @greggkleiner
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Read pages 1 through 3:

Praise for "Please Don't Paint Our Planet Pink!"

“A very intriguing children’s book.”
— Orion Magazine
“A whimsical ‘we can do this!’ call to action for both children and adults. This is the first book I’ve seen that playfully draws readers into the serious climate change issue. As a mother, I appreciate how it opens the door for discussion with children, first about the science and then about solutions. Without finger-wagging, mind-numbing science, or a hint of despair, Kleiner’s characters point the way. The illustrations engage, the book can be read in one sitting, and, most importantly, the characters exude hopeful attitudes without stepping away from the central issue we must solve.”
— Mary DeMocker, Writer, Musician, Founder of Climatemom.com
“This book is smart and funny – and about as important as a book can be. What could be more essential than helping children understand the science and consequences of global warming?”
— Kathleen Dean Moore, co-editor of Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril
“The carbon we are pumping into our atmosphere is an invisible but very real threat to us, our children, and grandchildren. So read Please Don’t Paint Our Planet Pink with your young ones, as I did with my 9-year-old daughter, and help them understand—in an entertaining and engaging way—how we are currently threatening our planet with fossil fuel burning, and what we can do to avert that threat. Every child and parent should read this important story.”
— Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor, Penn State University, and author of “Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change"
“Neat!”
— Andrew Revkin, New York Times Reporter and Sr. Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University's Academy for Applied Environmental Studies
“I’ve always wondered what would happen if CO2 were visible. Now I know!”
— Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth, and founder of 350.org
“It’s not easy to present science simply and accurately in a way that will engage children. It’s not easy to discuss environmental issues in a way that’s not preachy. This book hits all the right buttons. Both the writing and the illustrations are excellent.”
— Stephen M. Wagener, Professor of Biology & Environmental Sciences, Western Connecticut State University
“As an educator, I recommend this book be read to students. The storyline explains climate change in a fun and easy-to-read manner that keeps both teacher and students engaged. A very creative approach in helping children understand what they cannot see...well written, with wonderful illustrations.”
— Julie Johnson, MA, Educator